October 10

Tuesday Tip! Inviting Teachers to a Google Classroom

Did you know you can invite other teachers to be a co-teacher your Google Classroom?

When the invitation is accepted, both teachers can coordinate class activities.  This is especially helpful if there is a student support co-teacher for a class, if a teacher must be out of the building for an extended time, or if a student suddenly becomes home-bound, for example.  Continue reading

October 3

Tuesday Tip! Share Your Originals Without Fear

When you share a Google creation with a colleague, often you are including them as a collaborator who contributes, tweaks, and improves your work.  Sometimes, though, you want to keep your original document, slides, etc., well, original without collaboration.  In that case, there are a couple of ways to share it.

The first, and most common way, is to share your Google creation with View only rights.  This allows the folks you have shared your items with to access links but not make changes to your original.  If those with whom the item is shared want to use it and tweak it to make it their own, all that is needed is for the person to select File and Make a copyContinue reading

September 20

Tuesday Tip! What can Parents See in my Google Classroom?

There are two ways for parents to monitor what is expected of their student in Google Classroom.  One way is to use the student’s credentials and log in to get the student’s perspective.  Parents/guardians can just ask their student for his/her username and password or can visit his/her school to get that information.  Then, navigate to classroom.google.com to enter the student email and password and explore.

The second way for parents/guardians to monitor Google Classroom expectations of their student is for the teacher to invite guardians to sign up for a summary.  Frequency of summaries could be daily or weekly and guardians can choose their preference. Continue reading

May 16

Tuesday Tip! – Sheets, Charts, and Docs Working Together

We have become such a visual society that images and graphics really are an important part of our communication skill set.  Why not include charts as a way to reinforce a concept in a persuasive written piece?  Recently, a local high school English teacher did just that.  

When introducing a unit on The Holocaust, she asked students to rank their Top Ten for Who is Responsible for The Holocaust?  The teacher posted a link to a Google Sheet in her Google Classroom.  There were nine categories in protected cells and students could add their own tenth category.  Then, they entered numbers to rank each category.  Next, students converted the spreadsheet data to a pie chart.  Then, they inserted the chart into a Google Document and wrote a justification for their choice of ranking.

Basically, the  teacher saw three different types of effective responses for this assignment.  One student simply did a numbered list.  The pie chart helped to illustrate the ranking for the students to choose the level of responsibility and the student chose the ranking to be ten for most responsible and one for least responsible.  The justification was written with the highest ranking as the first numbered point.  Other students who wrote a numbered list ranked ten as leas responsible and one as most responsible.  So, the written justification certainly became an important part of the assignment.

 

Other students chose to write their justification in essay format, writing a paragraph as a way to explain the choices.  A student took the essay format one step further by changing font colors to match the categories on the pie chart as the explanation was detailed.  Sometimes the best differentiation comes from giving only basic instructions and allowing students to interpret!

 

 

 

 

 

Creating visuals solidifies ideas and concepts for readers and for students creating the visuals as well.  More importantly, an assignment like this gives the teacher a starting place for knowing what information is banked in students’ prior knowledge and what needs to be learned.  Amazing formative assessments don’t have to be locked into a ten question bubble sheet.  Why not smash a few apps together and really learn more about what students do and do not know?

May 9

Tuesday’s Tip! – Create Google Drawings to Create Deeper Understanding

Now more than ever, we are a visual society.  Constant access to the internet has completely revolutionized the way we communicate.  According to Jessi Hempel, who writes for Fortune Magazine, “Pictures are no longer precious; there are just too many of them.  Once collected and preserved as art, or to document memories, they are now emerging as a new language, one that promises to be both more universally understood and accessible to anyone.”

So, now, more than ever, we need to include images and graphics into our communication.  One way to do that is by using Google Drawings to create charts, memes, comics, and infographics which solidify new ideas in our minds.  Matt Miller says that by creating drawings, students get a firmer grasp on the content they are learning.   Continue reading

April 18

Google Tip #6 – Fonts and More Fonts!

Sometimes a simple variation in the font used can create a whole different feel for a document.  I love to include fun and sassy fonts when creating an infographic or HyperDoc!  The font chosen can add a whole different attitude to the work whether it is professional, fun, adventurous, cartoon-like, etc.  When using G Suite tools, there are hundreds of fonts to choose from for the perfect match to your creation.  The beauty of using web-based G Suite tools is that the font will look the same for the audience of viewers no matter how it’s accessed. Continue reading

April 11

Google Tip #5 – It’s Nice To Share

One of the things we are taught early in life is that sharing is a nice thing to do.  That concept never changes throughout life.  Sharing makes the world a better place.

Teachers are encouraged to share with one another to make teaching and learning better for all.  Usually we are glad to share and do so freely.  Yet, sometimes we want to retain the original integrity of our creations.  Using G Suite tools makes it easy to share as well as easy to keep your original.

Continue reading

April 7

Finally! Introducing EquatiO!

Finally a user friendly equation editor integrated with Google Docs and Google Forms! Introducing EquatiO!

EquatiO is a Chrome Extension that launches an equation editor at the bottom of the screen within Google Docs and Google Forms.

Students can collaborate in one Google Doc and insert their own equations or expressions.

Teachers can collaborate in one Google Doc to create assessments. Click the image below to see a demo in Google Docs.

 Download EquatiO from the Web Store.

Check out EquatiO tutorials on the EquatiO YouTube Playlist.

Happy equation writing!