December 5

Tuesday Tip! More Manipulating Google URLs

Last week we shared the Sir Links-a-Lot Chrome Extension, which makes manipulating G Suite product URLs a quick and easy process.  But, what if you are the recipient of one of those items and you don’t know for certain that you want a copy of this item?  Then, manipulate the URL so that you can see it without making a copy.  The process is as simple as this:

At the end of the URL is the word copy

 Change that word to view

Then, if a copy of the item is desired, simply choose File and Make a copy…

The same principal works when the URL ends with preview or template/preview or export?format=pdf

So, don’t feel as if you have to clutter up your Google Drive when all you want to do is view – manipulate that URL and view to your heart’s content!

November 28

Tuesday Tip! Manipulating G Suite App URLs with Sir Links-a-Lot Chrome Extension

Often there are times when we want to manipulate a Google Document’s URL to meet the needs of our students or when sharing with our colleagues.  In fact, one of our previous Tuesday Tips focused on Forcing a Copy.  Now there is a Chrome Extension which will make that easier for you!

 Sir Links-a-Lot   

After adding the Extension, simply click on the extension icon and choose how to manipulate the URL to best suite the need.  Options offered are: Force Copy, Preview, Template, PDF.  The Extension also offers to Copy the Link To Clipboard, Copy G-shortener Link to Clipboard, and Open the Link in a New Tab.

So, when choosing to force a copy, for example, the end of the URL will be changed from edit to copy.  Then, simply copy the manipulated URL and paste it to the desired location.  The extension is compatible with G Suite apps: Docs, Sheets, Slides, or Drawings.

Check back next Tuesday for more Google URL manipulation suggestions!

May 16

Tuesday Tip! – Sheets, Charts, and Docs Working Together

We have become such a visual society that images and graphics really are an important part of our communication skill set.  Why not include charts as a way to reinforce a concept in a persuasive written piece?  Recently, a local high school English teacher did just that.  

When introducing a unit on The Holocaust, she asked students to rank their Top Ten for Who is Responsible for The Holocaust?  The teacher posted a link to a Google Sheet in her Google Classroom.  There were nine categories in protected cells and students could add their own tenth category.  Then, they entered numbers to rank each category.  Next, students converted the spreadsheet data to a pie chart.  Then, they inserted the chart into a Google Document and wrote a justification for their choice of ranking.

Basically, the  teacher saw three different types of effective responses for this assignment.  One student simply did a numbered list.  The pie chart helped to illustrate the ranking for the students to choose the level of responsibility and the student chose the ranking to be ten for most responsible and one for least responsible.  The justification was written with the highest ranking as the first numbered point.  Other students who wrote a numbered list ranked ten as leas responsible and one as most responsible.  So, the written justification certainly became an important part of the assignment.

 

Other students chose to write their justification in essay format, writing a paragraph as a way to explain the choices.  A student took the essay format one step further by changing font colors to match the categories on the pie chart as the explanation was detailed.  Sometimes the best differentiation comes from giving only basic instructions and allowing students to interpret!

 

 

 

 

 

Creating visuals solidifies ideas and concepts for readers and for students creating the visuals as well.  More importantly, an assignment like this gives the teacher a starting place for knowing what information is banked in students’ prior knowledge and what needs to be learned.  Amazing formative assessments don’t have to be locked into a ten question bubble sheet.  Why not smash a few apps together and really learn more about what students do and do not know?

April 18

Google Tip #6 – Fonts and More Fonts!

Sometimes a simple variation in the font used can create a whole different feel for a document.  I love to include fun and sassy fonts when creating an infographic or HyperDoc!  The font chosen can add a whole different attitude to the work whether it is professional, fun, adventurous, cartoon-like, etc.  When using G Suite tools, there are hundreds of fonts to choose from for the perfect match to your creation.  The beauty of using web-based G Suite tools is that the font will look the same for the audience of viewers no matter how it’s accessed. Continue reading